Half Dead? • View topic - losing it and how to get it back?

losing it and how to get it back?

Yeah - we lose it. Some more than others but we all see a decline in abilities eventually. Weirdly enough though - this is often counterbalanced by an increase in other areas, like losing street stuff but gaining vert stuff. Whine away!

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Re: losing it and how to get it back?

Postby akropoliskater » Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:27 pm

Good to hear from you, Surfmon. You raise lots of interesting points.

Yes, fear is always lurking in the shadows. Even my 21-year-old-instructor Chris (a fearless and accomplished young shredder if ever there was one) describes every new trick that he introduces me to as "scary at first." He regularly accuses me of overthinking, and his constant admonition is "Just turn off your brain and commit to the trick." I've got to admit that I can't (yet?) do this. I think I'm past my fear of slamming—I'm certainly accustomed to falling and getting hurt—but somehow that's not enough.

Sciatic pain is a bitch. Address it in any way you can. There are a lot of sciatica websites with good ideas for daily stretching exercises. There's also spinal manipulation, acupuncture, and so on. My sciatica was so intractable I finally had to resort to surgery. My surgeon was good and I was lucky, so it worked for me. But surgery should always be a last-resort treatment. Just do whatever you can to ameliorate it.

I admire your guts for going back to dropping in. I haven't done it yet. Here are two things you might try as incremental steps. (1) Assuming access to a park, just roll off the top of a pyramid. It's good practice for the weight transfer part of dropping in. See 00:07–00:28 of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DeGFbGiPuc (2) This older guy's method of overcoming drop-in fear is unorthodox but interesting. See especially 00:53–01:44 of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92TFeyvQikM but watch the whole thing.

It always helps me to remember this: In skateboarding the tiniest improvement is HUGE, so be alert for that great feeling when you know that you're just a little bit closer to landing the trick.

Make the time to skate as often as you can, even if it's just stationary balance practice. Persevere man! We're all skating with you!
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Re: losing it and how to get it back?

Postby akropoliskater » Sat Apr 26, 2014 4:31 pm

Hi to my fellow skaters! Here are two links to a graphic that's guaranteed to help psych us up for some springtime skating:
http://pauwow.tumblr.com/post/785825046 ... ter-bronze [color version]
http://tiredskateboards.com/ [b&w version]

I've printed this out and taped it up on my garage wall right next to where I lean my ultra-ultra-mellow homemade wedge ramp.

Now that the weather is a little more civilized, I hope you've all been out getting your boardfeel back. It's amazing how much just rolling around a lot has helped me regain some skills that I thought I had lost over the winter. After several sessions of just pushing, with some carves and kickturns thrown in, I dragged out the aforementioned ramp (6" high) and, after a few average falls and one nasty slam, I'm nailing some decent rock-to-fakies on it. Small accomplishment, BIG satisfaction. Let us know if this ease-back-in approach works for you too.

By the way, the slam was nasty because my knee pads have seen too much wear. The pads themselves are intact, but the elastic bands have stretched and no longer hold them in position. When I fell on my right leg at a sideways angle, the impact rotated the pad out of the way and I took the hit directly on the inside of my knee. Even though I iced it for an hour as soon as I got home, I have a hematoma that needs 32-bit color to be fully appreciated. Moral of story: Make sure your protective gear is in top shape before going out.

Soon I want to try a somewhat unorthodox dropping-in practice move involving the pyramid at my local skatepark. My instructor says he's never seen anyone do it, but he's game. If it works for me, I'll tell you all about it. Wish me luck ;)
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Re: losing it and how to get it back?

Postby leebryan » Sat Jul 19, 2014 11:26 am

It's been a while, and I'm interested in your progress! Has the technicolor knee receded? Has the drop in happened?
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Re: losing it and how to get it back?

Postby akropoliskater » Mon Jul 28, 2014 10:55 pm

Hey Lee, thanks sooo much for your follow-up questions! I hope the absence of recent posts on the Half Dead community board means that all the participants are too busy shredding to post.
Yes, my knee is now fine, and I seem to have recovered pretty quickly from several subsequent mishaps, the most interesting being a faceplant that required 6 stitches in my lower lip. Combine that with the time the cops threw me out of my local skatepark (separate story), and I'm starting to feel like a real skater.
My "drop-in" (actually, roll-down) strategy worked perfectly for another senior skater of considerable ability, but not for me. Reason: my knees and ankles are neither strong nor flexible enough. When I finally squatted as low as I could on my board (with both feet in normal riding position), I found that I had almost no control of it at all. Not even on flat ground. I'm including squats and lunges in my twice-weekly workouts to see if I can improve this.
So I'm going with a more conventional plan: I push up to the pyramid, try to get as high up the incline as I can, and then roll back fakie. Thus far I can do this about 5 out of 10 tries, but I'm getting better. Still don't have the balls to roll off the top of the pyramid though. Also I continue to try to get my bs kickturn up to 180 degrees so I can pivot on the incline and skate back down regular. Practice, practice, practice.
The aforementioned old guy is in his late 50s and has had two shoulder replacements. (Neither was necessitated by skating.) He began skating in his early 30s, gave it up for years, and has come back with a bang. His sense of balance has always been as good as mine has been bad, and in addition to transition skating he can do crazy old-skool stuff. Example: He gets rolling, sticks his pushing foot straight out in front of him, bends his other knee so he's squatting low on his board on one leg, then reverses the moves and keeps riding. He calls this "the coffin" but I'm not sure if that's the right name.
Anyway, he and his son (mid-20s; began skating at age 12) skate with me once a week. They are relentlessly supportive and encouraging, and I always look forward to our Sunday sesh.
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